Weight Tilt- Pelvis

Another thing related to the weight on the walk cycle is the pelvic tilt. Depending on the weight distribution of the body, depends on the lean of the pelvis and shoulders.

In real life, the following rotations occur;

During normal gait cycle, a hip range of motion of 40 degrees flexion and extension can be observed, from 10 degrees of extension at terminal stance to 30 degrees flexion at mid-swing and initial contact.

A lateral pelvic tilt and hip abduction/adduction occurs at 15 degrees: 10 degrees adduction at initial contact and 5 degrees abduction at initial swing.

An internal/external rotation along with pelvic rotation totalling 15 degrees transverse plane motion can be observed, with the internal rotation peaking at the end of pre-swing.

gait-cycle-1-1-1-1

The hip movements- showing the bones. (Epomedicine.com, 2016).

In Richard William’s book (2001) he explains that, in a normal stride, weight shifts from one foot to another. As a foot is raised, the weight shifts forward and onto the side of the opposite foot (providing more support). (Anon, 2016)walk-backThe illustration (above) I found a little hard to read- I had a look to see if I could see some more angles online to help me a bit more. (Williams, 2001). 

I found the image below online. I think that to create this definite pelvic tilt, I am going to have to draw over my walk cycle recordings a lot!

walkcycle_front_rotate

Identification of the hip rotation from the front. (보기, 2016).

I found the below video really helpful when picturing this, from behind the model. The marks made it easier to visualise the movement.

Medical diagnosis from Pelvic Tilts. (YouTube, 2016).

So what I found was that the leading leg, on the contact pose, the hip rotates to that side as it’s furthest rotation. At the passing pose, the hips are back to the middle, no rotation occurs.

References

Anon, (2016). [online] Available at: https://sielearning.tafensw.edu.au/toolboxes/Toolbox805/fit_tb/fit009_2_lr7/fit009_2_lr7_4.htm [Accessed 4 Oct. 2016].

Williams, R. (2001). The animator’s survival kit. London: Faber.

Epomedicine.com. (2016). [online] Available at: http://epomedicine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/gait-cycle-1-1-1-1.png [Accessed 31 Oct. 2016].

YouTube. (2016). Video analysis of pelvic tilt during walking and low back pain at Kevin Hall Physiotherapy. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CKBgzulQ6E [Accessed 31 Oct. 2016].

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